DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself)

https://thevaluable.dev/dry-principle-cost-benefit-example/

I’ve chosen to talk about a very simple design principle this week called “Don’t Repeat Yourself”, DRY for short. It’s a topic that is covered in this class according to the syllabus and I chose it since its similar to another topic I covered YAGNI in that they’re easy to understand design principles. The meaning is quite self-explanatory, don’t repeat code since if you need to change the behavior of a certain project, you’d have to rewrite numerous lines of code if DRY wasn’t applied. However, applying this principle to everything isn’t efficient either. Trying to apply DRY everywhere causes unnecessary coupling and complexity which also leads to more difficulty changing behavior. According to the link above, using DRY means emphasizes knowledge above all else. What it means by that is that when designing and constructing software, one should have the knowledge of when to apply DRY and when not to for the sake of the readability and efficiency of the code.

In that context, DRY reminds me of the importance of resources in a computer when running something. If you want something run faster, you’ll have to sacrifice more memory. And when you want something to have more memory, you’ll have to sacrifice more speed. Both are valid choices; it really depends on the needs of the software and the user. Say for example, I want to create a program that lists all numbers from one to 100 which I do by writing out a thousand lines of code in which each prints a number. However, if I implement DRY, then I could create an integer variable r and a loop which prints the value of that variable and increments it by one until r equals 100. But the case where I want to alter the behavior to list every odd number between one and 100 is where thing get a bit interesting. In the DRYless scenario, I can simply delete the lines of code that print even numbers. Yet in the scenario with DRY, I’d have to add a condition that skips printing variable r for that iteration of the loop. You have to sacrifice complexity for readability and vice versa. Though the choice is ultimately up to what works best in the current situation. Like in my example, the added complexity from DRY doesn’t really harm the readability, in fact it improves it in some ways, at least in my opinion.

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